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Poster: Jack o' Roses Date: Apr 11, 2013 10:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Anybody remember in the 1970s when the Dead suggested 3D storage for music? current headline: 'Digital Memory Goes 2-D'

Anybody remember in the 1970s when the Dead tried to explore 3D storage for music?

Anybody know what happened there? (LiA?) I assume that this was still at the analog level.

Science is just getting to investigating 2D storage on the digital level.

http://cen.acs.org/articles/91/web/2013/03/Digital-Memory-Goes-2-D.html
"The memory inside an iPhone or a thin laptop relies on transistors made from silicon semiconductors to store data. Computer engineers run into silicon’s physical limits as they try to shrink these devices to fit more data storage in smaller electronics. This means researchers are on the hunt for semiconductor alternatives to silicon.
Now a team of researchers has demonstrated a new type of ultrathin memory device that’s silicon-free (ACS Nano, DOI: 10.1021/nn3059136). The devices, made from graphene and molybdenum disulfide, could someday store more data in a smaller volume than any made of silicon, the researchers say.
Today, the dominant form of memory is silicon-based flash memory. As engineers make flash memory’s silicon components ever thinner, the devices encounter problems such as current leakage, which saps power and reduces the electronics’ performance...."
Chemical & Engineering News
ISSN 0009-2347
Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Apr 12, 2013 10:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Anybody remember in the 1970s when the Dead suggested 3D storage for music? current headline: 'Digital Memory Goes 2-D'

Ron Rakow (head of their record company) said they were researching a holographic pyramid that would store music. It seems to have been a hoax, though, but fooled many.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Apr 12, 2013 12:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Anybody remember in the 1970s when the Dead suggested 3D storage for music? current headline: 'Digital Memory Goes 2-D'

It was discussed at length in the article. I think "another pipe dream they got hustled by" there were many) would be more appropriate. Digital storage was mentioned. The concept of storage wasn't that similar to the cd, which was first explored in 1974. It would not surprise me if the information that Rolling Stone printed was altered along the way, but the Dead were staunch supporters of the digital concept very early on.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: Apr 12, 2013 9:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Anybody remember in the 1970s when the Dead suggested 3D storage for music? current headline: 'Digital Memory Goes 2-D'

The touted and invested in an attempt to create a pyramid shaped receptacle that would work digitally. It was the precursor of the cd. I remember reading this in an article--maybe in the seventies--when the band was experimenting with all sorts of concepts. Obviously, it didn't pan out. The article was in a 1972 Rolling Stone titled "The Corporate Dead." Great caricature of Garcia looking like an inflated balloon on the cover.

This post was modified by ghostofpig on 2013-04-12 16:13:20

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Poster: Headphone Date: Apr 14, 2013 8:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Anybody remember in the 1970s when the Dead suggested 3D storage for music? current headline: 'Digital Memory Goes 2-D'

The pyramid storage thing was mentioned in a Deadheads newsletter mailed to me in '73 or '74 I think. We were just waiting and waiting for it to materialize! Right around that time we read in Popular Science or somewhere about a 3-D magnetic bubble memory system being developed by the military.

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